fbpx
Ultimate magazine theme for WordPress.

New Cargo drone of Boeing can lift heavy weight

29

Boeing’s newest prototype drone is a skeletal, squarish quadrotor built as a “flying test bed to mature the building blocks of autonomous technology for future applications,” the aircraft maker said in a statement recently. The aerospace giant unveiled a model for an electrical, unmanned freight air lorry that, it states, might carry as much as 500 pounds, which is equivalent to 400 big Domino’s pizzas. The drone has actually finished its preliminary round of screening, done inside at Boeing’s self-governing systems laboratory in Missouri.

The group can now begin developing its abilities. This very first model can fly for about 15 minutes and bring 150 pounds. A group of 50 engineers invested three months constructing exactly what appears like a car-sized Erector Set, fitted with eight spinning blades and weighing in at an advantageous 747 pounds. It looks and browses for challenges utilising parts and software application supplied by Near Earth Autonomy, a Pittsburgh-based business where HorizonX invests. The group is positive they will reach that 250-500 pound ability soon. They forecast that the cargo drone will fly in between 60 and 70 miles per hour and as high as a couple of hundred feet. What it will bring and where it will take it stays an open concern.

This kind of vehicle may not fit into any customer’s drone delivery fantasy, but it has practicality on its side. As home deliveries have grown in popularity over the past 15 years or so, shipments have gotten smaller, and more targetted. The old model—trucks haul supplies to Walmart, people drive to Walmart and bring home their shopping—is evaporating. Any vehicle that can fill in the gaps between the huge bulk shipments that move by sea and the shoebox-sized packages that come to our doors can play a role. Plus, a drone made to reach places like oil rigs or islands connected to the mainland only by ferries, might be easier to get into service.

Boeing has been working on developing drones for some time now. In December, Boeing unveiled a new high-tech refuelling drone to secure a contract from the US Navy which would mean that this unmanned aircraft will serve its MQ-25 Stingray programme, and would refuel fighter jets that operate from aircraft carriers, in mid-air. The drones, operated remotely, would be ejected from war ships in the same manner as fighter jets, the aim being for them to deliver the jets with 15,000 pounds of fuel, 500 nautical miles from the carrier. It is competing against aerospace and defence company Lockheed Martin and aeronautics firm General Atomics Aeronautical Systems for the contract. It is expected to be able to reach flight speeds of around 345 to 460 miles per hour. The MQ-25 is the latest in a series of large-scale drones to launch in recent years. Others include the unveiling of the world’s first passenger-carrying drone, in early 2016, and the development of the world’s smallest flying car, earlier last year.

Last year, Boeing was also selected by the Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop the XS-1 space plane that would be the first of an entirely new class of hypersonic aircraft that would provide short-notice, low-cost access to space. The company also recently acquired Aurora Flight Sciences, which last year won a contract to build the XV-24A LightningStrike VTOL plane for the DARPA design competition. Aurora has reportedly been developing electric-powered aircraft for long-haul flights for both commercial and military purposes. While Boeing isn’t the first company to create vehicles for drone delivery, its prototype is much bigger and more powerful than designs already unveiled by the likes of Amazon, UPS, and Google.


If you have an interesting article / experience / case study to share, please get in touch with us at [email protected]

Get real time updates directly on you device, subscribe now.

Advertisement

Subscribe to our newsletter
Sign up here to get the latest news, updates delivered directly to your inbox.
You can unsubscribe at any time
Comments

Join Our Newsletter Today!

Stay updated with all latest updates from the world of Business Technology, get exclusive invites to our upcoming events & much more.
Subscribe Now!
SUBSCRIBE NOW
close-link